Wars without End: The Indo-Pakistani Conflict

The three Indo-Pakistani conflicts (1947-48, 1965, and 1971) were all characterized by a low threshold of violence, limited scope, and short duration. A number of factors explain the limited extent of these conflicts: the common British imperial heritage, the lack of doctrinal innovation, and the pa...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:The annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 541 (1995), p. 167-178
Main Author: Ganguly, Sumit
Format: electronic Article
Language:English
ISSN:0002-7162
Item Description:Copyright: Copyright 1995 The American Academy of Political and Social Science
Physical Description:Online-Ressource
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  • The three Indo-Pakistani conflicts (1947-48, 1965, and 1971) were all characterized by a low threshold of violence, limited scope, and short duration. A number of factors explain the limited extent of these conflicts: the common British imperial heritage, the lack of doctrinal innovation, and the paucity of highly sophisticated weaponry. Although these three factors are no longer relevant today, the current recrudescence of violence in Kashmir is unlikely to lead to another full-scale war between India and Pakistan because, oddly enough, the incipient nuclearization of the region has introduced a level of stability at higher levels of violence. Only through misperception, miscalculation, and inadvertence could war once again erupt between these two states.