Sheath fold morphology in simple shear

Sheath folds are highly non-cylindrical structures often associated with shear zones. We investigate the formation of sheath folds around a weak inclusion acting as a slip surface in simple shear by means of an analytical model. We present results for different slip surface orientations and shapes....

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of structural geology, Vol. 53 (2013), p. 15-26
Main Author: Reber, Jacqueline E.
Other Involved Persons: Dabrowski, Marcin ; Galland, Olivier ; Schmid, Daniel W.
Format: electronic Article
Language:English
Physical Description:Online-Ressource
DOI:10.1016/j.jsg.2013.05.003
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  • Sheath folds are highly non-cylindrical structures often associated with shear zones. We investigate the formation of sheath folds around a weak inclusion acting as a slip surface in simple shear by means of an analytical model. We present results for different slip surface orientations and shapes. Cross-sections perpendicular to the shear direction through the sheath fold display closed contours, so called eye-structures. The aspect ratio of the outermost closed contour is strongly dependent on the initial slip surface configuration. The center of the eye-structure is subject to change in height with respect to the upper edge of the outermost closed contour for different cross-sections perpendicular to the shear direction. This results in a large variability in layer thickness across the sheath fold length, questioning the usefulness of eye-structures as shear sense indicators. The location of the center of the eye structure is largely invariant to the initial configurations of the slip surface as well as to strain. The values of the aspect ratios of the closed contours within the eye-pattern are dependent on the strain and the cross-section location. The ratio (R′) of the aspect ratios of the outermost closed contour (R yz) and the innermost closed contour (R y ′ z ′) shows values above and below 1. R′ shows dependence on the slip surface shape and orientation but not on the number of involved contours. Using R′ measurements to deduce the bulk strain type may be erroneous.